“The Key” by Pastor Andy Braams

Have you ever audited a course? I did. My first seminary course was to audit a theology course at MBTS. People may audit for different reasons, but for me, I felt like I might be called to go to seminary (this was actually before I received my call to ministry), but I needed to make sure. So, I decided to audit a course that was made available at the church where we attended. If it wasn’t for me, then all I was out was a little bit of time, and about 1/3 the money it would have cost me to actually take the class. The problem is that eventually I had to retake the course. I had to invest more time and more money to do much of what I had already done.

Perhaps, you have used that approach with some decision in your life. You dipped your toes in the water so to speak, and then made the decision. Really, the approach is not a bad one, and it is certainly prevalent in our society today.

The problem is that many people treat the Christian life this way. Let me audit it. If it works, then I will stay with it. If not, well, I haven’t lost much. I can just walk away. But, in reality, Christianity is all or nothing. We are either born again, or we are not. We are either a child of God or we are not. And, if we are a child of God, then we must realize the issue is not a game…it is serious.

In today’s passage, Paul makes this truth evident – both about himself and about those who claim to have a faith in God.

And as we consider our theme for this series – And Justice for All – we must realize that true justice only comes from God, and auditing will not accomplish what we might hope can happen.  God has designed this life for full credit or no credit. An audit option does not exist.

The truth of the gospel is that the credit has already been earned, it is just up to us to claim it. God has already done the work. He has made full credit available, as only He could do. But we have a choice in how we respond to the credit he offers.

What does Paul believe about this gospel? Can we do more than simply audit the Christian faith? Should we do more? Let’s look at this week’s passage to find out.

Today’s text contains two verses from Romans 1 which are quite well known. Most scholars believe that these two verses are the theme for Romans. That is, these two verses represent the key to understanding Romans. And what does a key do? It unlocks something. In fact, one commentator attempts to show this by revealing how these two verses outline the rest of the letter.

      • The Gospel being the power to save is first for the Jew can be found in chapters 9-11.
      • The need to live by faith is found in chapters 12-15.
      • And the ability to live a righteous life, and indeed to find the salvation to do so, is the essence of chapters 1-11.

Thus, the only chapter not included in this simple outline is chapter 16 in which Paul address the members of the church – both Jew and Gentile – to encourage them in their faith, which is the essence of the letter (see 1.11-12).

But even as these verses are the key, that does not mean they are completely straightforward. On the surface, they appear to be, but verse 17, in particular, is quite interesting, and has perplexed theologians for centuries. I will cover verse 16 and 17 briefly today and elaborate on the challenges of verse 17 in my videos this coming week.

For today, I want to focus on the bigger picture of these two verses.

Not Ashamed of the Gospel

First, Paul says, he is not ashamed of the gospel. In the previous sentence, he has indicated that one of the reasons he longs to come to Rome is to preach the gospel (see last week’s message). In one sense this notion should be evident because Paul had been imprisoned for preaching the gospel in Philippi, he had stood up to a riot because of it in Ephesus, he was chased from Thessalonica to Athens because of it, etc.

But people are ashamed of the gospel. Jesus says as much in Mark 8, when he said that He, Jesus, would be ashamed of them if they were ashamed of Him (see vv. 34-38). Paul also writes about not being ashamed to Timothy (2 Timothy 1.8,12). In both senses, the idea is that the shame comes from the fear of suffering and persecution.

Last week in India, a 7th grade boy, Samaru Madkami, was killed by a group of Hindu radicals. The report is that his throat was cut, his head was crushed with a rock, and then they cut his body into pieces. Why? He and his father, Unga, became Christians about three years ago. Since that time, young Samaru desired to be a pastor and was always sharing the Bible with children in the village. (1)

In other words, the boy was brutally murdered because of the gospel. Why would he risk his life? Why would Paul risk his life? Why should we risk such hostility for the sake of the gospel? Paul gives us the answer…

The Gospel Is the Power of God

It (the gospel) is the power of God for salvation. DL Moody once compared the gospel to a lion. All the preacher has to do is open the cage and get out of the way. To understand the gospel is to unleash the power of God in our lives.

That is the key for us. I will discuss salvation further in my Monday video this week, but before we are saved, everything is locked. The gospel is the key that unlocks all that God has for us. Now, God is still powerful whether or not we are saved. And God is still saving others by that power whether we choose to believe or not.

But the power of God that is mentioned here is the same power that has delivered salvation since the dawn of man. (Rick will cover some of that in his video this week.) It is not the power of the Roman empire that saves, it is the power of God. It was the power of God that fueled Jesus’ ministry. It was the power of God that brought Jesus back from the dead. It was the power of God that saved people in Paul’s day. It is the same power of God that makes salvation possible today.

Yes, the power of God is the key that unlocks the door to every other key. And knowing God’s power, Paul says with pride, “I am not ashamed of the gospel.” So, how are we living? Are we living in boldness because of that power or are we living in fear? If we believe in the one true God, we have that same power residing within us in the person of the Holy Spirit. As Paul wrote to Timothy from a Roman prison at the end of his life, “fan into flame the gift of God…for God gave us a spirit not of fear but of power and love and self-control” (2 Timothy 1.6-7).

The Righteousness of God

With the power of God unlocked by the receipt of the gospel, we receive another key – the righteousness of God. This righteousness, amazingly, is for the Jew and the Gentile. It was made manifest first to the Jews (we see that throughout the OT), but it was always meant for the Gentile too (as we will see in Romans 15).

Notice the word revealed. The righteousness of God is revealed. How? By the gospel which saves due to the power of God. So, once we have the key (i.e. the gospel), then we can have salvation, which, in turn, reveals the righteousness of God. (2)

Personally, I believe Paul means that God’s righteousness becomes evident to us and becomes evident within us. Both forms of this evidence are due to God. We cannot become righteous on our own and, in fact, we would not even know what true righteousness is without the gospel being made known to us. I will speak more to this issue in Tuesday’s video.

A Matter of Faith

Finally, through the power of God the mystery of His righteousness is revealed which then allows God to begin to transform our lives as well. (3) As we are transformed (Rom 8.29), we learn to live according to the righteousness that He is instilling within us. We learn to live by faith that this world, and even our own insignificant self, is not all that there is. As someone has said, apart from one very minor exception, everything that exists is not you.

And yet, God sent His Son to die for each one of those minute exceptions. And, once we take the key that unlocks that truth, all of the rest of the locks begin to open as well – including the ability to live by faith within the righteousness of God.

CONCLUSION

In John 14.6, Jesus said, I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except by Me. In other words, Jesus is the key. We cannot pick the lock, break the lock, cut the lock, blast the lock, etc. Only one key exists – and that key is the gospel of Jesus – that Jesus died, was buried, and was raised on the third day – for you and me.

How do you live your life? Are you ignoring what God has made possible? Are you attempting to audit a for-credit life? Or have you committed to living for the One who offers full credit based upon what He has already done?

JOURNEY:

Our JOURNEY letter for today is OOBEY.

The righteous shall live by faith. So let us, in faith, live right – in obedience to the God that made our salvation possible by His power, and His love.

NEXT STEP(S):

LIVE.  Unashamed – in God’s power, with God’s righteousness, the life of faith He has called you to live.

As a congregation, we took time to celebrate the Lord’s Supper as a reminder of the power, the righteousness, and the faith that is evident in the life of Jesus.

(1) https://www.christianpost.com/news/christian-teen-cut-into-pieces-by-radicals-in-india-3-years-after-conversion.html (Accessed June 11, 2020, 5:00 pm).

(2) Paul’s use of this phrase has puzzled theologians for years. I will explain some of the debate in a video on the church’s page this week. Search for Fairfax Baptist Church Missouri on YouTube.

(3) Again, Paul’s terminology “from faith for faith” and the way he quotes from Habakkuk 2.4 have caused a great deal of interpretative debate. I will explain some of this debate in a video this week as well.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.