“Becoming Like God” by Pastor Andy Braams

In last week’s post, I mentioned the idea of a child imitating others. It is because of this imitation that children learn to walk. That is, if all older children and adults crawled around on all four all of the time, a young child would not know that standing and walking was possible, let alone acceptable. Thus, through the process of imitation, children grow and learn to do more complicated things like walking, talking, and feeding themselves.

But who or what is imitated is important. For instance, most adults love to hear children make animal sounds. It might be cute, but think about how irrelevant that is in the scheme of life. Unless you are going to be hunting a certain type of animal, and need to lure them with a sound, that skill is irrelevant. However, adults do it to small children (not to other adults) and children learn to mimic that sound. And it is so fascinating we even have a song about it (Old McDonald or Old MacDonald or Old Mac Donald, people cannot even agree on the name of the man in the song).

But eventually, the imitations become more meaningful. While learning to walk, talk, and eat are important, most everyone is able to do these things by a certain age. But then the influence shifts towards an imitation of family members and/or friends in areas that define us as people. Labels regarding our health habits, work habits, skills, and abilities begin to dictate who we are and who are friends are. And from there, it becomes almost cyclical as we tend to gravitate towards the people most like us. Thus the next generation follows closely in our footsteps (or rebels heavily against us) and their imitation of us tends to perpetuate the cycle (or at least parts of it).

Before we get into our text, let me first remind us that this month’s system is the exocrine system. The exocrine system includes the skin. As we consider this idea of imitation, consider how we treat the skin. Children may not directly imitate their parents’ hygiene habits over time, but initially they do. They learn to bathe themselves as, and because, the parents have bathed them. They even use the same soap. They use the same mannerisms. They brush their teeth in the same general way, etc.

But more importantly, they learn to act and respond to various situations because they have watched others act and respond. Yes, each person has their own decision to make about how to respond, but we learn various types of responses by watching others and must then determine which is the best type of response for us.

But our response does not have to be dictated merely by observation. We can also choose to respond from knowledge gathered not from direct observation, but from absorption. What I mean is that our five senses allow us to experience various possibilities, but through a process such as reading, we can begin to absorb other possibilities that we may not have ever directly observed.

That is what makes the letter to the Ephesians so fascinating. We know that Ephesus was a hotbed of idol worship and that many were against the teachings of Christ (because it was disrupting their business which focused on selling objects of worship, cf. Acts 19.24). But we also know that Paul spent time there encouraging and strengthening believers by, in part, showing them how to live (Acts 19-20). That is, he was providing them a model to imitate.

And thus, when he later writes back to Ephesus, he writes not only about who God is and what He has done (Ephesians 1-3), but how the people should live (Ephesians 4-6).

So, last week, we began with Ephesians 4.1 and the need to walk worthy of the calling they had, and we have, received. It was not just any call. It was a call to be a child of God. I covered that verse extensively last week, but I want to briefly remind us of three words – therefore, urge, and called.

      • “Therefore” is a transition word which indicates what has been communicated prior to this is important, so now I am going to tell you what to do because of it.
      • “Urge” indicates that Paul realized that the people had a choice to make about how they would walk. Would they walk a new path according to the ways God would have them walk, or would they continue to walk in sin? Thus, Paul urged them to make the proper choice.
      • “Called” is in the past tense. I mentioned this last week, but it is crucial to the understanding of this letter. Paul is writing to people who say the believe. Thus, the actions they choose to take are not to earn salvation (which is by grace through faith, Ephesians 2.8-9), but because of their salvation. The lives are thus a response to what God has already done and called them to do (Ephesians 2.10).

So, this week, we move forward one chapter to Ephesians 5.1. Again, we have the word therefore. So, as I have often said (but did not say last week), we need to ask what the “therefore” is there for.

Again, Ephesians 4 is about the idea of walking worthily. Thus, Paul provides a list of ideas and commands in chapter four for the people to know what this new walk should look like. It is a walk based upon following one God (vv. 1-10) who has provided leaders to equip others to serve and be united as one body in ministry (vv. 11-16), which means leaving the old way of life behind (vv. 17-32). (Notice that as Paul begins to provide a list of commands, he transitions with another “therefore” in v. 25.)

Having provided these initial insights about what it means to walk worthily, Paul is ready to extend his argument. Now, before we look at 5.1, let us go back to the words of Jesus in Matthew 4.19.

As Jesus was beginning His public ministry, He says to a group of men, “Follow Me, and I will make you fishers of men.” Last week, I discussed that the “follow me” portion of that statement is about walking in His footsteps. This week, we move to the next portion of the statement, “and I will make you.”

Now, back to Ephesians 5. Paul wrote, “Therefore, be imitators of God, as beloved children.” The rest of chapter five develops that further, but I want to just focus on the few words in verse 1.

I wish I had another 4 hours for this, but we did cover this letter in detail several years ago. What I must say here is that Paul called these Ephesian believers “beloved children.” As I mentioned several years ago, the imagery is striking. We may think the idea of abortion and abandonment as something that is new. But the concept is not new; the timing is. Medical technology has given people knowledge of their pregnancy and potential child defects far earlier than has previously been possible. In the past, even within the last hundred years, people may not even know they were pregnant, and certainly could not know of any defects before birth. However, the idea of barbarism is ancient.

In the 1st Century, if you did not want your child, you took it outside the city, generally up on a hill or mountain and left if there to die or to be eaten by animals. But knowing this, some wealthy individuals would have slaves go and find these children and bring them back so these new babies would grow up to be servants as well.

That is a part of the argument that Paul is making here. God went to that hill to find us, to redeem us, to make us servants for Him. (Jesus went to that hill to die for us!) But Paul says that we are more than mere servants, we are beloved children. And, thus, as beloved children, we should want to imitate our Daddy! And, of course, the imitation would include how we walk (or live). In fact, that idea is very important as Paul not only used the term walk in 4.1, but also in 4.17 (not as the Gentiles), and then in 5.2, 8, and 15, all in reference to how we are to imitate God. And, let us not overlook that Paul sandwiches the need for us to imitate God between verses of God’s forgiveness (4.32) and Christ’s love for us (5.2)!

Thus, as children of God, we should manifest some of God’s characteristics. That is, we should be imitating Him and become more and more like Him. Now, here is where this verse parallels so nicely with Jesus statement along the shore of the Sea of Galilee.

The word for imitate in Ephesians 5.1 is in what is known as the “middle voice.” This type of verb means that we are both responsible to do something and to allow something. Thus, as we decide to imitate God, God makes us more like Him. We cannot choose to simply be more like God…God must empower that process, which He does through the Person of the Holy Spirit.

Likewise, in Matthew 4.19, Jesus said, “Follow Me, and I will make you….” The disciples had to choose to follow. But, if they chose to follow, it was Jesus who would do His part in making them into something, or someone else.

Ladies and gentleman, the same is true for us. If we choose to follow Jesus, God will do His part to transform our lives into something far different than we could ever be on our own. We will be able to do far more than we can ever do on our own. That is the economy of God which is built into Paul’s words just before He urged the Ephesians to learn a new way to walk. For Ephesians 3.20 reminds us, that God is “able to do far more abundantly than all we ask or think, according to the power that is at work within us.”

That power is already present if you are a believer. That power is working according to that verse. But we have to do our part to allow God to complete in us what He wants to complete. We do that by choosing to follow (walking) and imitating Him.

The question for each of us is: Will we choose to follow in order to become more like Jesus?

CONCLUSION

Young children imitate those who are older and begin to learn certain skills, habits, and even rituals based upon what they observe in others. As children grow, those skills, habits, and rituals become even more important. Teenagers, for instance, get jobs and begin to prepare for life on their own and thus who they imitate and what they learn to do can have significant long-term implications – for good or for bad.

Likewise, as believers, who we choose to follow and imitate will impact our growth in Christ. The reality, according to the texts we have reviewed today is that God will make us grow if we are willing to let Him do so. Again, Jesus said, “I will make you…” But that making is conditional on our choosing to follow. In fact, as I reviewed Jesus words in Matthew 4 and Mark 1 this week, a detail came to life for me. This was a detail I knew, but I had not fully considered in context. In Mark 1, when Jesus calls out to the men to follow Him, others were in the boats too, but they did not follow. That simply means that Jesus did not get to “make them,” or “mold them” into something more than they are already were.

Do you want to be more? Do you want Jesus to mold you? As we think about the exocrine system, we generally think of the skin. Our skin is very resilient. Just think about how much it gets stretched when we bend or sit. Or how much it pulls when we smile or cringe. The skin is tight, and yet not too tight. It is pliable. It must be to allow us to function.

But are we pliable? Are we flexible? Do we let Jesus mold us, or stretch us, so we can become what He wants us to become? The reality is that if we truly follow Jesus, we may be stretched more than we want, but that is the only way to become like Him. And, as we learn to become more like Jesus, that is, as we learn to imitate Him, we can teach others to be more like Him as well (Matthew 28.20).

Our JOURNEY letter for today is:  JJESUS.

Our letter is J for Jesus because we must learn to be more like Him, but as we submit to that goal, it is Jesus who has promised to do the real work. Remember, it was Jesus who said, “Follow Me, and I will make you….” We must choose to follow Him, but then He will do the work in us as we continue to follow. But the choice to follow is one we must make daily. For as Paul said, I urge you to walk worthy of the calling you have received. We must choose to start, and then continue, walking with Jesus if we are to become who He wants us to be.

PRINCIPLE:  If we choose to imitate God, He will empower us to become like Him.

QUESTION:  Will we choose to follow in order to become more like Jesus?

OPPORTUNITY:  Jesus said, “Follow Me.” Paul said to “Imitate God.” To follow Jesus is not about making a one-time decision, it is about counting the costs and following Him daily.

NEXT STEP(S)LEARN: Read Ephesians 4.25-5.4 each day for the next two weeks and choose one command each day as your focus in learning to imitate God. Try to walk like Jesus. Just as a young child emulates patterns of others, we are to emulate the life of Jesus. This week, simply choose to take a few steps that you suspect Jesus would take, especially if you would rather not do so.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.