“Passing the Test (Part 3)”

Again, this month’s system is the excretory system. The excretory system is responsible for removing waste from the body. In particular, the wastes to which I am referring is waste from the kidneys. Blood flows into the kidneys carrying wastes. The blood is filtered by nephrons and then released back into the rest of the body and the waste is dispatched from the body as urine.

But what happens when the kidneys do not work right? When this happens, it is known as renal failure, and renal failure can be caused for a few reasons such as one or both kidneys:

      • not getting enough blood to filter
      • being diseased (caused by any number of factors such as diabetes, high blood pressure, etc.)
      • blockage caused by a kidney stone or scar tissue.(1)

Renal failure can be acute, which can be serious, but with proper treatment, the kidneys usually regain their function. However, chronic renal failure leads to a permanent loss of function and lead to a buildup of wastes in the blood which causes a need for dialysis or a transplant. (2)

Thus, as we have seen over these past couple of weeks, the kidneys play a vital role in our health because if wastes are not removed, then we can face serious health risks. And these wastes are removed by the filters (called nephrons) which must “test” the blood in order to remove the necessary waste.

Again, as we have seen all year, the church needs systems which parallel the systems of the human body. Our series this year has focused on the body of Christ (i.e. the church) as we have reviewed ten different systems of the body and equated those systems to some aspect of the church.

This month, the excretory system is providing a backdrop for us to review a series of tests Scripture provides for us to make our lives better which is similar to the nephrons filtering out what would make us unhealthy.

The past two weeks, we have looked at the tests from an individual perspective first, and then from the perspective of the church. And that makes sense in one way, because it is more difficult to function as a group of people if we cannot function individually. However, as I often remind us, within the New Testament, almost all of the commands are plural. That is, these commands are to y’all, or for our purposes, the body of Christ.

So, even as we consider how to live out these commands individually, we must focus on living them with each other collectively.

With that in mind, let us turn to the last five commands in the verses we have been reviewing from 1 Thessalonians 5.

The Test of Quenching (1 Thessalonians 5.19)

The command here is about quenching the Holy Spirit. We are commanded not to do so. What does Paul mean by the word quench? One definition would be to extinguish. This idea is what mean when we say we want to quench our thirst. We want our thirst to be gone (or extinguished). That definition could be true in Paul’s writing, but I think he has a different idea in mind.

Another definition for quench could be to thwart or suppress. Of course, if we suppress the Spirit, eventually, we may extinguish the Spirit, but that is why we have the command here. It serves as a warning for the church there and then, and to us here and now, to test ourselves to ensure the Holy Spirit is not only a part of our lives and church, but that He is welcome among us and is allowed to do what He wants to do.

Can you imagine a church that suppresses or thwarts the Holy Spirit? I can. Why? I do. And I would guess that you do too. I seek to be sensitive to how the Lord is leading, but sometimes I sense He desires something from me and I balk. In fact, while writing this paragraph, I knew He was asking me to stop writing and take time to just be with Him. And part of me wanted to do so. And part of me wanted to finish my sermon. But how can I write about not quenching (not thwarting) the Spirit if I am going to do it while I am preparing to discuss it? So, I did stop for a while.

But the point is that I do not always stop. And I do not always follow. And that is sin. I would suppose we are all guilty of being an obstacle to the Spirit at times. We would rather do what we want to do. And, if that is the case individually, imagine what we, as a church, may do to suppress the will of the Lord.

Ugh!

So, let us aim to welcome the Spirit, not suppress Him. Let us desire what He wants from us rather than trying to thwart Him. Indeed, let us let Him quench our wants by giving of ourselves to Him.

The Test of Truth (1 Thessalonians 5.20)

This test is very much related to the previous test. When Jesus was teaching His disciples about the Spirit, He called the Spirit the “Spirit of truth” (John 14.17) and said it was the Spirit who would remind them what Jesus taught (John 14.26). And remember, it was Jesus who made the statement, having just called Himself the truth a few moments earlier (John 14.6).

Paul’s choice of words in 1 Thessalonians 5.20 is a Greek word that means prophecies. But a prophecy is “communicating and enforcing revealed truth.” (Strong Concordance, prophetia, #4394). So, to prophecy is to reveal the truth.

Therefore, what Paul is commanding to the church in Thessalonica is to not despise the truth. Now, the reality is that in our day, it is becoming increasingly difficult to know what truth is, apart from the Bible. We have #fakenews. We have people who are paid to spin the details. We have people who craft new words and phrases (such as reproductive health) to avoid using others (such as abortion).

Why do we have these challenges? Because people despise the truth! And Paul is commanding the church then, and us today, not to be among those who do despise the truth. Very bluntly, a part of that is to accept the Bible for what it says rather than to attempt to alter its meaning so we feel better about what we read or hear. The standard for understanding is not determined by the reader; it is the author who controls the meaning. And, in this case, the Author is God, and specifically, the Spirit. Thus, if we do not want to quench the Spirit, we need to embrace the truth as He has communicated it.

In other words, by despising the truth, we quench the Spirit. But if we embrace the Spirit, we should receive His truth, and He will then allow us to better understand the truth (1 Corinthians 2.11-16).

The Test of Evaluation (1 Thessalonians 5.21)

How do we know the truth? We test it. But we must evaluate the truth against something objective to know that it is the truth. Otherwise the truth begins to shift and then it is no longer truth.

What is 2+2?

4. That is objective truth.

Fairfax is in which state?  Which Fairfax?  Missouri?  The Fairfax district of Kansas City, Kansas?  Or the Fairfax found in 11 other states, not counting other districts within cities.

The answer to that question is objective truth, even though the answer has multiple possbilities. But it is still truth. How do we know? We can evaluate it.

But our methods of evaluation are changing. For instance, some children’s sports leagues now do not have winners and losers. It is one thing to say, “It isn’t whether you win or lose, it is how you play the game.” And it is another to not allow anyone to keep score.

The truth, as truth has traditionally been defined, is that our world wants to change the standard of evaluation. The new standard is to accept what we want to believe in the moment rather than remain true to standards which have been proven for centuries, if not millennia. We have replaced truth with existentialism. Now, I am not overly averse to change, but some concepts, such as morality are not meant to change. For instance, most everyone here is thrilled that technological advances have made medical care much better over the past 50 years. But stealing someone’s medical information should still be considered a crime. So, the change in technology is good, but the moral code needs to remain as it has for eons.

But to evaluate either issue (technology or morality), we must have a standard. And that standard is otherwise known as a truth.

The Test of Remaining True (1 Thessalonians 5.21)

So, Paul next wrote that we should hold fast to what is good. Now, what is good, in this sense, means something that is true. It does not mean holding on to an ice cream cone until it melts. Why should we hold fast (or cling) to what is good? Because what is good is something that is true. The truth may not always feed good, but it is good for us. For instance, if the doctor tells us some truth about our health situation, the truth may hurt, but that does not mean it is not the truth, and something we need to hear.

However, in today’s world, an understanding of what truth is, is being distorted. The challenge of remaining true is that if we do not measure truth against something permanently known to be true, then how can we know what truth is. The general philosophy of truth being a relative concept is known as postmodernism.

Postmodernism does not believe in a standard of knowledge or truth. Thus, truth is always evolving and is existential – what is true for you is not true for me. But some ideas are true. You may want to use a different word for gravity, but the idea of gravity is real. You may want to jump to the moon, but regardless of what other truth you may hold, gravity will not let you jump that high on your own power.

But let us lay aside human arguments (of which we have plenty to consider) and think of the Bible. Because the most important truth we can hold is to be true to God through Jesus Christ. It is Jesus to whom Scripture refers as Faithful and True (Revelation 19.11). And it is to Jesus that we are to be faithful and true. That is the very essence of holding fast to what is good.

Our world is seemingly becoming more challenging to those who hold fast to Jesus. Recent statistics show that Christianity is growing and atheism is declining. (3) So what is the problem? The problem is that those in the middle are shifting away from Jesus. We have seen it in the attendance in this church – not because people leave this church to go somewhere else (although some have), but because most quit going to church at all.

That is why Paul commands us to hold fast to what is good. And it is why we, as the church, must not only encourage each other to do the same, but to reach out to those who have let go, and help them to hold fast once again. Whether they have lost their grip, or forgotten what is good, we can show them again, in addition to helping others discover for the first time, what is truly good – Who is truly good, and why we must hold fast.

The Test of Avoiding Evil (1 Thessalonians 5.22)

If we are successful in the previous four tests, we should pass this test easily – not because of our own strength, but because we have not quenched the Spirit. See, if we quench the Spirit, then we are going to do battle on our own. But if we embrace the Spirit, then we will not despise prophecies, we will test and know what should be held and what should be avoided, and that will allow the Spirit to help us better understand truth and avoid the evil around us. It is a big circle.

But when we embrace evil, all of that breaks down and the Spirit’s presence (really, His impact) is limited because we have suppressed/thwarted Him, and we must stand on our own. And the Bible is clear, in a statement of truth to which we must hold fast, that we cannot stand on our own. As Paul wrote to the church in Rome, we all fall short of God’s glory (Romans 3.23). We need Jesus (Romans 6.23).

CONCLUSION

The list of seventeen commands in these eleven verses of 1 Thessalonians 5 (vv. 12-22) are quite evident. As commands, each truly represents a test we need to pass. And, as verses 18 and 19 say, these tests represent a part of God’s will in Christ Jesus, and thus the Holy Spirit is mentioned as one who can and will help us to succeed. Truly, when we review many of these tests, we see similar words that are used in Galatians as related to the Holy Spirit. That passage is Galatians 5.22-23, which contains the fruit of the Spirit. Let’s compare.

The fruit of the Spirit (Galatians 5.22-23) is love (c.f. 1 Thessalonians 5.13), joy (c.f. v. 16), peace (c.f. v. 13), patience (c.f. v. 14), kindness (c.f. v. 14, help the weak), goodness (c.f. v. 20, do not despise prophecies – truth), faithfulness (c.f. v. 21, hold fast to what is good), gentleness (c.f. v. 14, encourage the fainthearted), self-control (c.f. v. 22, abstain from every form of evil). Against such things there may not be a law, but with such things we can test ourselves.

Our JOURNEY letter for today is:  JJESUS.

I really wanted to use O for our letter today because passing each test would mean we have Observed or Obeyed God. But the reality is that we cannot pass these tests without God’s help through His Spirit. And we do not receive the gift of the Spirit unless we embrace the truth of our need for Jesus. So, our letter for today is the J for Jesus.

PRINCIPLE:  Our ability to live according to the unchanging nature of God’s truth is dependent on the presence of the Holy Spirit within our lives.

QUESTION:  How can we make certain that we, as a church, do not quench the Spirit?

OPPORTUNITY:  Confess to God a desire to know and embrace all of His truths, regardless of the cost, in order to unleash the power of His Spirit in your life and in this church.

NEXT STEP(S)LEARN: Take time to evaluate any areas from 1 Thessalonians 5.12-22 that might quench what the Holy Spirit wants to do in your life. Then move from evaluation to acting (LIVE) upon any changes that need to take place.

1 https://www.urologyhealth.org/urologic-conditions/kidney-(renal)-failure (accessed October 18, 2019).

2 Ibid.

https://factsandtrends.net/2019/06/11/7-surprising-trends-in-global-christianity-in-2019/ (accessed October 20, 2019).

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