“Going to the Specialist”

Our system for August is the endocrine system, but because of the Fair Service in the park next week, we will have an abbreviated look at that system. The endocrine system controls how the glands and hormones interact with the rest of the body, particularly the organs. The glands produce hormones that help to regulate the internals of the body.

The word itself is made up of the combination of two Greek words. The first word is “endo” which means “within.” The second word is “crinis” which means to secrete. Thus, the endocrine system is about secreting chemicals throughout the body to keep it functioning properly. These chemicals are produced by glands such as the thyroid, the pituitary gland, and pancreas.

Most people do not give a lot of thought to their glands and hormones until something goes wrong. And any number of factors, including unseen factors such as stress, can send our hormones into a state of flux. Many people experience issues with their thyroid, but the most common endocrine issue is diabetes which is the result of the body not being able to process glucose correctly because the insulin produced in the pancreas is either not working correctly or because insulin is not being produced adequately.

Last month our system was the nervous system which allows for communication from our sensory receptors to our brain. The goal last month was to consider how our senses lead us to care for others. This month, we focus more on the communication itself. Again, a slight imbalance in the chemical makeup of a person can lead to a myriad of problems. Likewise, communication issues within the church can lead to many different challenges. And, just as people do not often consider the importance of their endocrine system, people do not fully realize how important communication is within the church.

Consider this, everything the church does is communication. As we worship, we are communicating with each other and with God. Singing is communicating with God. Praying is communicating with God. Announcements are communicating with one another about upcoming opportunities. A sermon is the communication of God’s Word. In fact, all Bible teaching is meant to be the communication of God’s Word. When you arrived today, you spoke to various people. Gathering with others in the church might be called fellowship, but it will involve communication. Evangelism is communicating with others the truth of what Jesus has done. A baptism is a public communication of a personal commitment someone has made. The Lord’s Supper is to be done “in remembrance of me,” so says Jesus. Thus, when we partake of the elements we are communicating to Jesus that we think what He did is worth remembering. Cleaning the church is communicating that we believe the place we come to meet with God is worth keeping nice. Etc. Etc. Etc.

Everything the church does relates to communicating. But to effectively communicate as a church, we must first focus on our communication with God. Why should this be our primary focus? Because it was for Jesus.

The prayer we call the Lord’s Prayer was read earlier. As I have said before, I think the title would be better called The Disciple’s Prayer because Jesus taught the prayer to His disciples. We have no record of Jesus praying this prayer, only stating the words that others might use. But we do have examples of Jesus praying. If Jesus, as God, needed to pray for strength and guidance, then certainly we need to pray as well.

Before I get to our key verse for today, take a moment to read a few verses related to Jesus praying. I have selected a verse or passage from each of the four gospels and have organized them chronologically – near the beginning of His ministry, before He raised Lazarus from the dead, before His death, and one after being raised from the dead.

Mark 1.35: “And rising very early in the morning, while it was still dark, he departed and went out to a desolate place, and there he prayed.”

After a long evening of healing the day before, Jesus began early before the day’s interruptions began.

John 11.41-42: “So they took away the stone. And Jesus lifted up his eyes and said, ‘Father, I thank you that you have heard me. I knew that you always hear me, but I said this on account of the people standing around, that they may believe that you sent me.’”

Notice Jesus words: “I thank you that you HAVE heard me.” That is, Jesus knew His past prayers have been heard. And now, He is confident that His current prayer will be heard.

Matthew 26.39: “And going a little farther he fell on his face and prayed, saying, ‘My Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as you will.’”

Jesus taught His disciples to pray “on earth as it is in heaven.” Notice in this prayer, He says, “as you will.” He prayed what He taught, but more importantly He practiced what He preached (by following the Father’s will all the way to the cross).

Luke 24.30: “When he was at table with them, he took the bread and blessed and broke it and gave it to them.”

Again, we do not have the specific words, but in Jesus blessing the bread, I believe a part of the disciples recognizing Him was that He did this the same way He had done before feeding the masses, not to mention seeing the scars.

Of course, we have other instances of Jesus praying – as He was baptized (Luke 3.21, the words are not there, but it says He prayed), prior to selecting the Twelve who would be called apostles (Luke 6.12), before feeding the masses (Matthew 14.19), and after feeding the masses (Mark 6.46), etc.

So, Jesus prayed. And, thus, we should too.

I have provided evidence that we should pray, but now I want to focus on our real need to pray. We have the Bible as our guide, but without prayer, we do not have specific guidance for what God wants from us. Yes, I know we often pray for what we want, but the Bible says that God will give us the desires of our heart when we find our delight in God (c.f. Psalm 37.4).

How do we delight in God? Well, one way would be to follow His will. How do we know His will? Through prayer. Consider the words of Jesus in John 5.

John 5.19: “So Jesus said to them, ‘Truly, truly, I say to you, the Son can do nothing of his own accord, but only what he sees the Father doing. For whatever the Father does, that the Son does likewise…’”

How does Jesus know what the Father is doing? By talking to Him. Consistently. Even constantly.

So, what are we to do? What does Jesus want from us?

Again, we have the Bible as our guide. First, Jesus said the most important thing we can do is to love God with all of our heart, soul, mind, and strength. In doing that, we are also to love others. Loving others means we will then heed Jesus words to make disciples. And making disciples is the means by which Jesus is building His Church.

And that leads us to a verse we have reviewed often. We will see it in its larger context again in two weeks, but in response to the greatest statement ever made by any human other than Jesus, Christ Himself responded with a promise. The statement was made by Peter – that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of the living God. And Jesus response was that on the foundation of that truth, He would build His church (Matthew 16.16-19).

That is Jesus’ mission. That is His ongoing ministry. It is a ministry that has been in place for nearly 2000 years and one that will continue, with His promise, until He returns. How do we do it? Well, the Bible provides a lot of good examples and many direct commands on what we should and should not do. But to know specifically what we are to do NOW, in this time and place, what we are to do?

The answer will take communication. First, we must communicate with God. And then we must communicate with each other. We have seen that Jesus communicated with God and therefore, it is most reasonable that we have a need to do so as well. In fact, if Jesus needed to pray, we REALLY need to do so.

God has a plan for each of us individually, and all of us collectively. And communication is the means by which we can know and then fulfill that plan. But it all starts with following Jesus’ example of praying – not just for our needs, but to know God’s heart.

CONCLUSION

The practice of medicine has changed a great deal in recent decades. Certainly, the understanding of the human body has increased drastically since the early days of mankind, but we have seen incredible advances in treatment in just the last few decades. One reason for that is the technology that is now available. But another is the increase in specialization.

60 years ago, if something was wrong, you called the doctor. If your head hurt, you called the doctor. If your heart stopped, you called the doctor. Perhaps the doctor would come see you at your house, but regardless of your ailment, you called THE doctor.

Now, you go to a doctor in order to be told what doctor you need to see. If it is your head, perhaps you will see a neurologist, or maybe an ENT (ear, nose, and throat specialist). If it is your heart, you see a cardiologist. Blood? Hematologist. Bones? An orthopedic specialist.

But what if the problem is the Body of Christ? Sure, you call (or blame) the pastor. But the pastor is not THE specialist. Jesus is. We are called the Body of Christ and therefore our care should come from a doctor that specializes in caring for that kind of body. That doctor is not just any doctor. That doctor is the Great Physician. That doctor is Christ. And, thus,…

Our JOURNEY letter for today is:  JJESUS.

I have already stated several times that Jesus has provided us with an example of prayer. Prayer is essential and yet many (most?) people are unsure of how to pray. The reality is that very few have the prayer life they would like, but when we realize that prayer is not formal, it is merely like talking to our friend, or a loving parent, then our concerns about praying should disappear.

Jesus gave His followers a model. But what is important is not the words, it is the heart. As we seek to know what God wants for us, we will change, and in turn, we can change the world. That’s what Jesus wants. He wants us to change the world one person at a time, beginning each of us, through love and making disciples. And it all begins with communicating with Him.

PRINCIPLE:  If Jesus prayed, we need to pray as well.

QUESTION:  How can you make you communication with Jesus be as natural as you would talk to your closest friend?

OPPORTUNITY:  Breathe Jesus! Then talk to Him as if you were talking on the phone with a friend – taking the time to listen to Him respond.

NEXT STEP(S)LIVE: Most people doubt the ability to “pray without ceasing” (1 Thessalonians 5.17) but if we realize how easy it is to talk to God, we will desire to live our lives in constant prayer.

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