“A War Zone”

July 4, 1776. December 7, 1941. June 6, 1944. September 11, 2001. These dates are all dates which will live in infamy. Why? Because each date represents a major declaration of intent with regards to war. The colonies were already engaged in battle before we declared our independence from Britain, but July 4 made war inevitable – and war continued for seven more years. Parts of the world was already engaged in war in the late 1930s, but one fateful morning at Pearl Harbor energized a nation to engage in what was truly a world war. June 6 has been called by some historians the most important day in history. As a follower of Christ, I must consider a certain day when Jesus died and another when he arose as greater, and we might consider a few other days important as well, but without a doubt, the day we call D-Day changed the war, and likely the course of the 20th Century. And, of course, most recently, September 11th, 2001, moved the needle on terrorism from something that happened over there – wherever “there” was – to our homeland. The dynamics of war had changed as for the first time in 70 years, the certainty of war was declared not only on our country, but on our land. Thus, September 11th like the other dates I just mentioned (July 4th, December 7th, and June 6th for most people) are dates that do not require a year to be mentioned for most Americans. We simply know the significance of the date.

But that is changing. Many, including myself, do not know the hardship of war. I do not mean the fear of battles, I mean the true sacrifice of war! The sacrifice not just of death, but of families being gripped with fear, of a country banding together, etc. Some of this happened in 2001, but it was short-lived. In prior generations, the country had to band together – had to sacrifice to survive. Food was rationed, people overcame differences, and a country was united for a common purpose – preservation, which meant the need for victory.

But for many that memory is too distant. 57 years passed between D-Day and Sept 11. Another 18 years have passed between Sept 11 and today. As fresh as that day is to many of us, some who were not alive on that day have now graduated high school. Indeed, other important dates have come and gone throughout our nation’s history, but only a few reverberate like the four mentioned above. And the further we get from those dates, the less concern people show. Please do not think I overlook the importance of our military today, because they have been fighting a war for nearly two decades, and in some ways, we have had very little peace since the beginning of the Korean conflict. But even that phrase proves part of my point – was Korea a conflict or a war? Perhaps the lack of concern about the significance of warfare, and in particular the dates mentioned above is from neglect, but more likely it is simply because time has passed.

What is true of wars between nations is true in a different way for the body. Our theme this year is not about war, it is about systems in the body. And our body is constantly at war. Each day our body takes in foreign substances. Some of these substances are good for us – like food. But some are not, including certain types of food. And thus, God has designed our body to fight harmful substances – whether food, virus, germs, or whatever, in order to maintain our health. Specifically, two systems are given this task – the lymphatic and the immune systems. I will say more about these systems in the next couple of weeks, but without these systems working properly, our body’s health is compromised – sometimes for a short time, and other times indefinitely. Unfortunately, most of us ignore these systems until that compromise has occurred. And, if those systems are not able to wage war properly, our body will be defeated. Without truly considering the nature of this war, the terminology used commonly reflects the fight as you have likely heard, “He is a fighter” or “She faces an uphill battle.”

But our focus is not a war of nations. Nor is it a war of systems against the foreign substances in our bodies. Our focus is on the health of the church. Parallels do exist because the war is against differing ideologies. And like a nation that is asleep, or a body that is not receiving the proper nutrition and care, the church can quickly find herself in a battle that can easily be lost if we are not on our guard. Yes, the Church will be victorious in the end, because our Lord, who instituted the Church, was victorious. But that does not mean that battles and skirmishes will not claim individual churches along the way. Even Jesus spoke about such matters in the letters to the churches in Revelation 2 and 3. For today, however, we will review Paul’s words to the church in Corinth.

Take a moment to read the first six verses of 2 Corinthians 10. Just a few weeks ago, I preached on 2 Corinthians 12, and I have preached on this particular passage before as well – specifically, a couple of years ago. However, in light of the idea of warfare, let me briefly share the background and then we will closely examine Paul’s words.

Background

The church in Corinth was a church that had many problems, just like most churches. In this letter, Paul is particularly concerned with the response of the Corinthians to a leader (or leaders) who has (have) come to move the church away from the core of the gospel. We see evidence of this throughout 1 Corinthians when Paul reminded them of the truth and simplicity of the gospel (e.g. 1 Corinthians 15) and how they should respond to one another because of that truth (e.g. 1 Corinthians 11-14).

In this letter, Paul writes about the pain the church has been caused. He says it is not from him, providing a few comments that lead us to believe this false leader tried to coerce giving (2 Corinthians 9.7) and challenged Paul’s authority by claiming to be greater than Paul (notice the term super-apostles in 2 Corinthians 11.5). Furthermore, Paul compares the deception of this person (these persons) to Satan. Indeed, Paul indicates the actions are being influenced by Satan (cf. 2 Corinthians 11.12-15). And thus, Paul says to wage war – not in human terms, but under the direction and power of the Lord. Let us quickly examine 2 Corinthians 10.

A Reminder About Paul (2 Corinthians 10.1-2)

Paul reminds them of who he really is. This false leader has distorted Paul and his authority claiming that Paul is one person when with this church (he is meek) and another when he is away (bold in letter). More importantly, Paul has been accused of walking in the flesh – that is, of continuously, and deliberately, sinning. And this is where Paul’s language turns to warfare.

 A Declaration from Paul (2 Corinthians 10.3-6)

Paul acknowledges that as a human, he does walk in the flesh, but does not walk according to it. That is, Paul does not allow the flesh to control his life. He realizes that the flesh is at war with the things of God, and therefore the flesh cannot be the source of his power. Notice the words Paul’s uses in this declaration.

        1. 3 – waging war
        2. 4 – weapons
        3. 4 – warfare
        4. 4 – power
        5. 4 – destroy
        6. 4 – strongholds

Paul not only acknowledges the battle, he shows he is actively engaged in one. These words are not used haphazardly. These words are strategic. These words are used by commanders as they prepare a plan for battle. Consider the conversations prior to D-Day for instance. Questions about how to wage the battle, what weapons would be most effective, and how to overcome the strongholds would all have been a part of the planning. The words that Paul used to put the church on guard against false leaders are some of the same terms that General Eisenhower and General Montgomery would have used in coordinating the attack on the beaches in France.

But Paul continues in the next two verses pinpointing the exact tactics of the enemy. Let us look at the words in verses 5 and 6.

        1. 5 – destroy
        2. 5 – arguments (implies fighting)
        3. 5 – raised against (like raising a foreign flag in a country)
        4. 5 – take captive (prisoners)
        5. 6 – punish

11 war terms in three sentences making up four verses in our English bibles. The people of Corinth allowed a determined leader to come in an confuse them. We might call this tactic an infiltration. The leader was speaking against the “knowledge of God” (v. 5) – to the church! And the church allowed it. Furthermore, they questioned the founder of their church (Paul) because of the lies being spread.

A Challenge from Paul (2 Corinthians 10.7-18)

The remainder of this chapter is Paul’s exhortation for the church to remember who they are, and what the prospects of that truth may mean. Remember, in verse four, Paul states that the enemy’s strongholds must be broken. It was not enough to invade enemy territory, the goal was to take control. Why? So the battle could be extended further (see verses 15-16). Paul’s goal was not only to bring the church of Corinth back to her rightful place, he wanted to create a base to deploy troops to extend the message of God to new places. That is, Corinth was not the goal, but a beachhead had to be secured there to then destroy strongholds in new places – extending God’s kingdom and planting new churches so the message of Christ would further influence the region and the world. Let me show you why Corinth was important!

From Corinth, Athens was easily reached by land. Rome was just across the sea. In fact, if you look closely, you will see that Corinth could serve as a hub, from which, Paul and others could go throughout the region – and that is just what they did, leaving Corinth for Ephesus, for instance, during Paul’s 2nd journey.

CONCLUSION (tie to system)

Having just observed the 75th anniversary of D-Day, one of those momentous days mentioned earlier, the day is likely the most freshly impressed on our minds today. It was a day when good had to overcome evil – an evil that was firmly entrenched, an evil that wanted to expand further. The remedy was a bold attack by brave individuals to bring a turning point to the war in Europe and, thus, to history.

Likewise, the human body has systems in place, the lymphatic and immune systems (which will get more focus next week), to boldly attack enemies that enter our body. Like a soldier, they must seek out and destroy the enemies to keep us healthy and allow us to continue to live as God gives us the opportunity.

But again, our focus is the church. Unfortunately, evil has invaded many churches at a level that seems unrecoverable. Perhaps, at some level, this is true of our church. But complacency and carelessness can lead us to fall prey to the same situation that happened in Corinth. We need to be reminded of the dangers. We need to be reminded that a war is being waged for all churches, including this church. Again, the battle has been won, but that does not mean that we will avoid becoming a casualty.

In the movie, Tora! Tora! Tora!, in response to the attack at Pearl Harbor, Japanese Admiral Yamamoto said, “I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant and fill him with a terrible resolve.” (No proof exists that he actually said these words.) Ladies and gentlemen, I believe too many Christians have that same fear about awakening Satan. But the reality is, Satan is not sleeping, the church is! Satan is on the attack and most churches are not actively doing all that  can be done to not only thwart the enemy, but to expand the Kingdom!

Yes, our bodies have a constant war going on inside them. But the church must acknowledge that we are a part of a much bigger war. We must band together as brothers and sisters, using the power of God to destroy the strongholds that grip the lives of people in this church, in this town, in this county, state, country, and world.

The commander we serve is greater than Eisenhower, Patton, Roosevelt, Churchill, and certainly greater than Rommell, Hitler, Mussolini, and Hirohito. And that…

…is why our JOURNEY letter for today is:  JJESUS.

We must remember that the greatest evil to invade our lives, the greatest infection that pollutes our bodies, is sin. But our Great Commander fought the battle for us – a battle that only He could fight, a battle only He could win.

But the victory claimed by Jesus was not for Him alone. The victory was secured by Jesus alone, but the victory is for all who place their faith in Him. For those who take that step, the next step is to put on the armor of God (Ephesians 6.10-20) and prepare for battle.

PRINCIPLE:  The life of the Christian is one of war; we must remain engaged in the battle at all times.

QUESTION:  How does knowing Jesus has won the war help you prepare for battle?

OPPORTUNITY:  Prepare for battle each day by putting on the full armor of God.

NEXT STEP(S):

LEARN:   Take time to memorize the items in Ephesians 6.10-20 and determine what each item truly represents.

Weekly Nugget:  2 Corinthians does not give us any definitive clue as to the number of leader(s) who attempted to lead the Corinthians astray. 2 Corinthians 2.5 uses the singular pronoun “he” which could indicate it was one individual; however, 2 Corinthians 11.5 uses the plural “super-apostles” which would denote multiple individuals. Either way, Paul was calling the church to stand strong and defend the truth that he had taught them during his trip to Corinth.

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