“Tainted Blood”

Consider one area of your life about which you are most confident. Perhaps it is something you are able to do, some person with whom you relate, some aspect of your health, etc. The reality of confidence is that sometimes we can become overly confident. In one moment, life is going great, and then it changes in an instant. In fact, I am about to express something that I am confident is true for every one of us – we do not schedule emergencies. Indeed, that truth is what makes an emergency an emergency. Work issues, maybe. Family issues, probably. Health issues, definitely.

One such health issue is sepsis. Sepsis is a potentially life-threatening condition caused by the body’s response to an infection. The disease kills about 200,000 in the US each year which is more than breast cancer, prostate cancer, and AIDS combined. (1) The body normally releases chemicals into the bloodstream to fight an infection. Sepsis occurs when the body’s response to these chemicals is out of balance, triggering changes that can damage multiple organ systems. If sepsis progresses to septic shock, blood pressure drops dramatically – often leading to death.

In such times, we may not be confident about life – or the life of a loved one. Many questions will fill our minds and many concerns will fill our hearts. Although it is true that our confidence in most every aspect of life is fleeting, the Bible is clear that we can be confident in the promises of God. And those promises include what Jesus has done for us.

Today, we remember the resurrection of our Lord. But we should do more than simply remember it, we should celebrate it. How it is celebrated may be different among various people, churches, and denominations. But celebrating it should be because Jesus not only died, but the fact that He rose again. And that truth is why we gather week after week and year after year. Not just to remember and celebrate something we know, but to be encouraged and challenged to live according to how He has called us to live because of His sacrifice for us.

So, as we review the text from Hebrews 10 today, a text that may not seem to be about the resurrection at first glance, let us remind ourselves that without the resurrection, this text would not make sense. Indeed, the text would not be present. But because it was written which is, in part, because of the death and resurrection of Jesus, we can and must pay attention to what God desires from us. And, as this text begins, we can do so, with confidence.

We Are to Have Confidence (Hebrews 10.19-21)

The text begins with the word “therefore.” As I have often said, we must ask what the therefore is there for? Well, the entire letter to the Hebrews is about something and someone being better. And Chapter 10 begins with the fact that the sacrifice Christ made was a better sacrifice because it was a once and for all sacrifice. That is, because of His sacrifice, we no longer have to take our bulls, or sheep, or other assorted animals and crops to be given as a sacrifice. Jesus paid it all. As He said, on the cross, “It is finished” (John 19.30). So, that is the context of the “therefore.” But we are not here to celebrate His death, we are here to celebrate the resurrection, so we must go past this first word. There we find we can have confidence through His death to do what otherwise was not possible. Let’s take a look at what the writer says.

First, our confidence is BY the blood of Jesus (v. 19). So, the sacrificial theme continues from what the author had written in the preceding verses. But notice now, that our confidence is not in His death, but by the new and living way that He opened for us. Again, it was opened though His flesh (v. 20), but the way is alive. In the Old Testament, it was the responsibility of the priests to make the sacrifices on behalf of the people. And verse 21 says Jesus is that priest, but the sacrifice He made was giving of Himself, and thus, it is a lasting sacrifice. That is, the death gave us the opportunity to be freed from our sin, but the resurrection gives us an opportunity to live. And we are called to live in the very next set of verses.

Now, some may not have that confidence for any number of reasons. But one reason is because you do not have the hope of Jesus within you. I will say more about this in the next couple of parts, but I urge you to give God a chance in these next few minutes.

We Are to Draw Near (Hebrews 10.22)

To what or whom are we to draw near? Well, ultimately, we are to draw near to God, through the hope that we have in Jesus. James conveys this same idea in his letter. But here the writer expounds on this idea in three ways.

First, we are to draw near with a sure heart. That is, we are to have confidence. As Jesus told His disciples on the last night He was with them, “Let your hearts not be troubled…” A time of agony was approaching, but in the end, everything would be worth whatever price had to be paid. The same is true for us. Life may not be easy, but because of Jesus, we can approach God confidently – not arrogantly, but confidently.

Second, we are to draw near with full assurance of faith. The key here is the idea of faith. It does take faith, but we all have faith in something. Some may not believe in God, so their faith is in something or someone else, even if that someone is themselves or that something is a thought that they are right about God not existing. But this idea of faith is more than what we think; it speaks to what we do. Having full assurance of faith means that we can be confident that our actions toward God, done because of our faith in Christ will be noticed. We do not seek honor; we seek to glorify God, but as we saw last week, faith must lead to obedience. So, our obedience to God will lead to us being confident to draw near to Him much like a child who has done well and knows s/he is loved wants to be near their parent.

Third, we are to draw near with a clean heart. Having a clean heart is the equivalent of having a pure heart, and Jesus said in the Sermon on the Mount that those who have a pure heart are blessed and will see God. That is the essence of drawing near. It is the hope we have of one day drawing near. But we do not have a pure heart, and our blood is tainted. And that is why Jesus had to die – and again, that is what the author here says can bring us the confidence we seek!

We Are to Hold Fast (Hebrews 10.23)

We are to hold fast without wavering – that is, in full assurance. In other words, we are to hold fast with confidence. Why? Because God is faithful. He was. He is. And He will be faithful.

Now, here is the part I want any potential skeptics to understand. Again, I acknowledge that the resurrection is a matter of faith. I was not there. I did not see Jesus die and I did not see Him alive. But you were not there to see Him not die. And you were not there to prove that He did not come back from the dead. What I do know is that many people’s lives have been changed including those who lived with Him. For instance, one of those closest to Him, Peter, was fearful for his life and denied knowing Jesus before Jesus died, but outwardly spoke about Jesus, was beaten for doing so, and would eventually die for his faith after Jesus died. What changed? The only sensible solution for me is that Peter saw Jesus alive after he knew Jesus had died.

This is what the writer means by holding fast to the confession of our hope. And hope from a biblical perspective is not a verb as in “I hope (or wish) something is true.” Biblically, the idea of hope is a noun; it is a certainty of what has and/or will happen, but that we have yet to experience. Our hope is in the fact that Jesus is alive. Our hope is in the fact that we will be with Him. Yes, I believe He suffered. Yes, I believe He died. Yes, I believe He was buried. But I also believe He came out of the tomb, and unlike some who are resuscitated but die again, Jesus is still alive – though not physically on this earth.

If you do not believe that, let me ask you something. Are you skeptical about life? As Carey Nieuwhof says, you cannot have hope and be a skeptic at the same time. Having hope means one remains curious; being a skeptic is to close the door on possibilities. Perhaps you used to have big dreams. Perhaps you use to have some sort of faith in God, but life happened or is happening, and you have shut the door to your heart and mind and the dreams have stopped. The questions have stopped. You are no longer curious. And now you go through life as a skeptic. (2)

A closed mind leads to closed a heart. And a closed heart will turn away from God. I urge you to ask God openly and honestly what He wants to reveal to you. I say this to anyone – one is born again or one who thinks Christianity is a hoax. But realize if you ask God a question, He might just give you an answer. As I often say, God is not scared of our questions, but we must be prepared to accept His answer!

So, for those who truly believe, we are to have confidence. We are to draw near to God. And we are to hold fast. But the writer gives us two more thoughts that must apply to anyone is truly born again.

We Are to Be Together (Hebrews 10.24-25a)

The writer says we should stir up one another to love and to serve. Of course, true love requires serving. But this service (the good works) is to lead others to praise God. That idea is the essence of our church’s vision statement with our focal verse being Matthew 5.16. The idea is that we are to be the light of the world and do good works that others might see what we have done and give praise to our Father in heaven. Very practically, in order to stir up one another, we must meet together. Sure, phone calls, texts, emails, etc., are valid ways of communicating for us, but they did not exist in that day. So that could be one reason the author says not to forsake meeting together. But I believe two other reasons exist as well.

First, Christianity was not designed to be an individual faith. Christianity is meant for community. Even God is a community consisting of three persons – Father, Son, and Spirit.  Community is important to help others remain close. We all know people with whom we used to be close but have lost touch with over the years. The same thing happens in church. So, the writer urges us to keep meeting together so that does not happen to us.

Second, the writer is talking about what must be done in confidence. To meet together in the first century was a risk. But for those who had confidence and were willing to draw near to God, they must also draw near to one another to maintain that confidence. Notice the next phrase in verse 25 – encouraging one another. Why did they need encouragement? Because everyone else was against them. Parts of the world have experienced this for centuries, and the Church in America is close to experiencing this in the 21st Century. How can we overcome the challenges? By encouraging one another to hold fast to our hope. In other words, to remain confident. And to do that, we will need to continue to meet together.

And that leads us to the last point which is found at the end of verse 25.

We Are to Be Ready! (Hebrews 10.25b)

As the Day approaches, the author says that our need to meet together will be of major importance. Again, as more people become hostile towards Christians, the best way to stay strong, to stay true, will be to regularly meet with others who believe the same. That belief is in the death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus – who is Lord.

CONCLUSION

In that last verse, the word Day is capitalized in many bibles. The reason is because it is not just any day, it is the Day of His appearing and/or judgment. God will be victorious and all wrongs will be made right. The truth of the matter is that those who are born again can be confident because their wrongs were made right on the cross by the sacrifice of Jesus. We are not to just  believe this truth mentally, we are to embrace it with their lives. For those who do, the payment demanded on that Day has already been made. For those who do not believe and embrace that truth, all wrongs will be counted on that Day and payment will be required – of you!

Why? Because we have all wronged God. It is called sin and the Bible is clear that all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God (Romans 3.23). It is like the sepsis I mentioned earlier. A small infection can lead to sepsis and contaminate the whole body. While intravenous antibiotics are a common treatment for sepsis, a transfusion of red blood cells is being tested as an option. But when it came to sin, the only remedy was exchanging the blood of Jesus for our blood. God knew that our lives were tainted. So, He gave His Son to cleanse us. But Jesus did not come to make sick people well; he came to make dead people live.

And that is why our JOURNEY letter for today is:  JJESUS.

Jesus did not come to give us a transfusion of blood, but He came to give us a transfusion of life!

QUESTION:   How will you respond?

OPPORTUNITY:  Be confident in the hope we have in the resurrection of Jesus.

NEXT STEP(S):

LIVE:  Confidently in the hope of the resurrection – drawing near to God, holding fast to hope, meeting with other believers consistently, and being ready for Christ’s return.

(1) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5618595/ For real life stories of people with sepsis you can visit the following website: https://www.sepsis.org/faces

(2) See the first section of Carey Nieuwhof’s book, Didn’t See it Coming. Nieuwhof, Carey. Didn’t See it Coming: Overcoming the Seven Greatest Challenges That No One Expects and Everyone Experiences. New York: Penguin Random House, 2018.

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