“Lifeblood”

Some of you may have heard about a remarkable story that occurred last weekend. A 61-year-old woman from Greta, Nebraska gave birth (in Omaha) to a baby girl named Uma. One part of the story which makes it remarkable is that the 61-year-old is not the mother, she is the grandmother. Let me provide a few details now and complete the story later.

The woman has a son who wanted to have a child. The son and his spouse were not able to have a child of their own. So, the spouse asked his sister to donate eggs and through invitro fertilization, the son’s sperm and the eggs of the sister’s spouse allowed for conception. However, gestation took place in the woman who is ultimately the grandmother of baby Uma.

I will return to this story near the end of the message because another aspect of it makes it even more remarkable. But the system this month is not the reproductive system (that was January), it is the circulatory system. So, what could a birth in Nebraska have to do with the idea of how blood circulates through the human body? Now, before you jump to any conclusions about the health of the baby or mother, as far as I know, both are doing fine.

The connection to the human body is the fact that blood must circulate through the body to allow us to have life. Thus, the circulatory system is critical to the body. And a key component of that system is a muscle known as the heart. If the heart is good and the arteries are not clogged, then blood flows as it is supposed to flow. However, if the heart is bad and/or if arteries get clogged, then the same blood that gives life, will actually be a part of our death.

For our purposes this month, I have paired this system with the respiratory system because our breathing and our blood are required for living. As these systems relate to the church, I believe the connection is teaching. The teaching ministry of the church is vital, for as Jesus said in His commissioning us to make disciples – we are to be “teaching others to observe all that I have commanded you.” In February, we looked at the respiratory system and, in doing so, centered on 2 Timothy 3.16 which reveals that Scripture is God-breathed. But again, blood is also necessary and important. It is necessary because without it we die. It is important because God says that it is what gives us life. In fact, in Genesis 9, God tells Noah that he can eat anything but not with its blood – that is, it shall not be living.

Again, blood is the source of our life, but a problem with that blood, such as clotting, can lead to death. In our passage today, we will see that a false understanding (that is, a problem with understanding correctly, which has some relation to teaching) can lead to death. That passage comes from Exodus 7 which contains the first of the ten plagues – when God turned the water in Egypt into blood.

SETTING THE SCENE

Before we look at the text, let me reset the stage for you. Moses was born in Egypt around the time that the Israelites were growing in number and the king (Pharaoh) felt threatened. So, Pharaoh ordered all of the young males to be killed, but Moses’ mother was able to hide him and eventually was able to care for him safely because Pharaoh’s daughter found Moses’ in the river, and Moses’ sister asked if she needed a Hebrew woman to nurse the boy (Exodus 2).

So, Moses grew up as the son of Pharaoh’s daughter, but he knew he was a Hebrew and later killed an Egyptian for beating a Hebrew slave. Pharaoh wanted to kill Moses so he fled and ended up in Midian where he met his wife and tended sheep. Many years later, God called him back to lead the people out of Egypt towards the Promised Land (Exodus 3). The earlier king had died and now a new Pharaoh (presumably, Moses’ uncle, remember Moses was adopted by Pharaoh’s daughter, and the new Pharaoh was likely the son) is in place. That brings us to Exodus 7 where, Moses, who is 80 years old (see Exodus 7.7) is told to confront Pharaoh with the threat of major miracles against the people of Egypt unless Pharaoh allows the Hebrews to go to the wilderness to worship.

So, that catches us up to the text for today. But we need to remind ourselves of one more fact that was read in the reading earlier. And that fact is our first point for today.

A Hard Heart Is Not Willing to Listen

Pharaoh’s heart was hardened and he would not listen (Exodus 7.13). Now this sentence is after a significant event takes place in front of Pharaoh. We must first understand that Moses had been doing miracles by the hand of God earlier. Exodus 4.30 says that Moses did signs in the sight of the Israelites, and they believed. But when he did signs in front of the Egyptians, they did not. Why? In part, because they were pre-disposed not to believe, which is because, in part, they thought they were in control, not God.

When Aaron cast down his staff, it became a serpent. Pharaoh’s magicians were able to do the same thing “by their secret arts” (Exodus 7.11). Impressively, the text tells us that each of the magicians was able to throw down their staff and it became a serpent (v. 12). But Aaron’s swallowed up all of the others.

Let’s face it, if we saw something like this, it would probably get our attention. If it was me, I would probably look directly at one of the wise men or sorcerers with an inquisitive face and ask the question, “What happened?” If I was one of the sorcerers or wise men, I think I would have weighed my words very carefully because I doubt they knew what had happened (or, at least, why), and the wrong answer could have had them killed.

But regardless, Pharaoh was there. It could have impacted him, but it didn’t. The text says, “Still, Pharaoh’s heart was hardened.” The truth is that Pharaoh did not want to believe what he saw and so he didn’t. And thus, his heart remained hard. He did not listen. And it was time for God to show Him the fullness of His power. For our purposes today we are only looking at the first plague, but it is hard to imagine a heart remaining hard after all God did, but Pharaoh would not change, and so by the end, God would not allow it to change.

A Hard Heart Is Not Willing to Receive

Let me read the rest of this part of the story. (Read Exodus 7.14-24.)

Let me begin with the ending. Verse 23 says that Pharaoh did not take what had happened into his heart. That is, Pharaoh was not willing to receive the evidence of God’s power. Why? Because, like the serpents in the previous portion, he had people providing false information. He was unwilling to listen to Moses and Aaron (v. 22), because he was paying too close of attention to those who could deceive others with their magic.

Now, we can we can almost understand this because how could Pharaoh know that Moses and Aaron were not doing the same type of magic acts? But the principle goes much deeper and that is where I want to spend the next few minutes.

Both miracles involved turning water to blood. Moses took his instructions from God (v. 20). But Pharaoh did not need to take instructions from anyone, especially someone he likely considered inferior to him. Sure, they were family at some level, but Moses had skipped town for four decades and he was still, after all, a Hebrew.

Both miracles involved turning water to blood. The result: the fish died, the water stank, and the people could not drink it (v. 21). In other words, the blood caused death. As I mentioned earlier, God said that life is in the blood (Genesis 9), but here the blood specifically causes death.

But the reason for the death is because Pharaoh would not listen to God. He would not listen to the teaching God was offering. Pharaoh thought he knew best, and as long as his magicians could replicate the miracle, well, why change? If you look further into the story, the magicians are able to do the next miracle as well, but they could not get rid of the problem. But by the third miracle – the gnats – even the magicians recognized the power of God. However, Pharaoh was still unwilling to listen, his heart was still hard, and he was not willing to receive what God might have been willing to offer.

As we move to the last point, I want to focus on the contrast regarding these last two points about Pharaoh with what I mentioned earlier about Moses.

A Soft Heart Is Willing to Change

Moses grew up under the tutelage of a Pharaoh. Without any doubt, a part of his education was similar to that of the current Pharaoh. But for Moses, a part of his education also included an understanding of God – and that understanding stayed with Him until He had a personal encounter with God which changed him.

Moses was a murderer, but he had a heart that was willing to change. Like Pharaoh, Moses did not want to listen to God, or at least he did not want to follow God. In Exodus 3 and 4, Moses gave three specific excuses (I am a nobody – 3.11; they will not listen to me – 4.1; I am slow in speech and tongue – 4.10) and then outright refused God’s request – 4.13). But in the end Moses followed, a people were saved, and a world was changed. Why, because Moses listened to the words of God. Moses literally had a one-on-one teaching session with God. And, in the end, that teaching made all the difference.

The ultimate contrast between Moses and Pharaoh is this:

Moses was called to lead a large nation, but he realized that God was ultimately in charge.

Pharaoh was a mighty king over a great empire, but he always thought that he was the one in charge.

Ultimately, the difference is an understanding of who God is. And understanding can only come through some form of teaching and our response to it. And that leads me back to Baby Uma.

CONCLUSION

Because Baby Uma’s story is even more remarkable than a 61-year-old woman giving birth to her granddaughter. What I told you earlier was that the son of the woman who gave birth was not able to have a child with his spouse. But a very good reason exists for this. It wasn’t that the spouse was infertile. It was because the spouse was a male. See, a man and his “husband” wanted to have a child, but biologically that is impossible. So, the “husband” asked his sister for her eggs and the fertilized egg was then placed into the son’s mom. This is the power of modern medicine.

Now, we might be able to debate the virtues of invitro fertilization, and perhaps that is a worthwhile debate. But that is not the issue I want to bring to light today. The issue for today is that two men fully realize that the miracle of birth must (MUST!) include both a male and a female. But, perhaps it is possible, they thought, to manipulate the design to do what we want to do. And, with some planning and thought, they were able to become parents in a way that God never intended.

Now, before I move to back to Pharaoh, let me plainly state, that Baby Uma has done nothing wrong. She deserves all of the love and affection that any baby deserves. And, let us also be clear, that what was done, is because of the medical industry allowing people to become parents that otherwise might not be. Many of you may know a male father and female mother who have children through invitro fertilization. But, as with most any human thought, if an idea can be manipulated for further gain, it will be.

That was Pharaoh’s guilt. He abused the Hebrews as slaves. He asked him wise men and sorcerers to replicate what God had done. And, because it happened, he thought he was in control. Likewise, these four individuals in Nebraska, have replicated what was presumed for centuries that only God could do (that is, to bring life), and they think they are in control.

Why? Because somewhere, somehow, the lifeblood of humanity has failed. That is, the teaching about an omniscient and omnipotent God has been replaced by the thoughts and pleasures of man. But this is nothing new. It goes back to the days of Jesus, and, as we have seen today, back to the days of Moses. And, if we dig further, we see that God was so upset with these ideas in the past that a flood did not just cover parts of the Midwestern portion of the US, but of the entire earth in the days of Noah.

Why, because we are all sinners. Pharaoh was. The sorcerers were. Moses was. The family in Nebraska is. And you and I are too. And it is that sin, and the tainted nature of our blood, that leads us to death. Therefore, we need the blood of a Savior – and that Savior is Jesus.

And that is why our…

JOURNEY letter for today is:  OOBSERVE.

This truth about Pharaoh is a chilling reality to so many in our world. It is why the teaching ministry of the church is so important. In fact, the church is centered around teaching. Yes, we must worship, but it is difficult to worship what (Who!) we do not know and teaching helps to make that connection. Yes, we must fellowship, but we often gather with those who are similar to us and the church is to be unified in mind and heart because of the teaching. Yes, we must serve, but how can we serve if we do not know what to do or why it is important – and thus, the need for teaching. And yes, we must proclaim the gospel, but how can we do it if we do not know it? So, teaching is critical. I am not suggesting it is more important than fellowship, or worship, or serving in ministry, or evangelism, but it is no less important than all of those ideas. So, teaching is a critical component of the church. And that is why I link it to the respiratory and circulatory systems of the body because without healthy teaching, the church will die.

PRINCIPLE:  Because we are sinners, we must continually be taught the truths of God.

QUESTION:  Is your heart hard or soft towards the full teaching of the Word of God?

OPPORTUNITY:  Attend the study this Wednesday evening to know more about studying the Bible (to teach yourself better) and, perhaps, to teach others better as well.

NEXT STEP(S):

LEARN:  Learn the Word of God so you can teach others to observe all that He has commanded. (Matthew 28.20)

LIVE:  Live the Word of God because that is what it means to observe what He has commanded.

LOVE:  Love the Word of God because it will soften your heart and allow you to be molded by Him.

LEAD:  Lead others by your example showing them that a heart softened towards God is truly special.

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