“The Importance of Connection (Dem Bones)” by Pastor Andy Braams

Sticks and stones may break bones, but these types of breaks normally heal. However, severe falls or other serious accidents can cause a bone to break in a way that leaves them damaged to the point where they are unable to heal themselves. Certain bone diseases and cancer can cause similar issues. When this happens, one option is a bone graft.

A bone graft is a procedure when a bone from one part of the body (e.g. part of the hip bone) is used to repair a bone elsewhere. The idea is that the cells from the healthy bone will fuse that bone (or bone fragment) into the damaged bone. This idea is more than 100 years old but has recently been updated with a new twist.

Within the last few years, an idea has surfaced regarding using bones from cadavers to help patients who need a screw or plate. Traditionally, screws and plates are metal and can be rejected by the body. But using bones made into screws, for instance, is being used to see if the rejection rate will decrease and give surgeons a new method for treating these types of injuries.

The truth is our bones are connected. As the song, Dem Bones says, “The foot bone’s connected to the ankle bone. The ankle bone’s connected to the leg bone. The leg bone’s connected to the hip bone. The hip bone’s connected to the back bone. (And) the back bone’s connected to the neck bone.” Usually we think bones being connected by ligaments and tendons. Yet, using one bone to heal another is a different kind of connection, but one that makes sense if it works.

Likewise, those who follow Christ – that is, the body of Christ – are connected. In last week’s message, we were reminded that it is Jesus who builds the church. In that message, we connected the ideas of people (and truth) being the right pieces, placed perfectly, and given true Power by the only Person who could do it. And that connection between members of the body is based upon truth. After all, the connection is through Jesus, and Jesus’ statement about Himself included, “I am the truth” (John 14.6).

So, today we are going to look at three ways we, as the people of God, should be connected. We will do so by reviewing the book of Nehemiah and particularly three sections of it.

Nehemiah Overview

The book of Nehemiah tells the story of a people whose home has been destroyed. The home is not one particular home; rather, it is the city of Jerusalem. The destruction began when Babylon took Israel captive in about 587 BC. Nearly 150 years later, many of those who were in exile had returned, but the town was in constant jeopardy because the wall had been destroyed. Nehemiah is a servant to the king in Persia and upon hearing the news of the wall asks to return to Jerusalem to repair a wall, heal a people, and effectively lead a nation into its future.

That is the basic story of Nehemiah in a paragraph. But within that story, several subplots exists. And within those subplots we have many principles from which we can learn (e.g. the importance of prayer and principles of leadership). Today that lesson centers on connection.

God’s People are Connected in Focus (Purpose)

Read Nehemiah 2.11-12a, 19-20

In response to Nehemiah’s statement, the people rose up to begin to rebuild the wall. These people were a community connected by what mattered for the community. We see this connection within a focus when communities rally behind a team or some kind of event. And we see a focus in communities when crises hit (or near crises). Certainly, Fairfax saw this happen in the summer of 2016 when we had the wind storm come through. Friends and neighbors, even from other towns, came to help the clean up process. So, a common focus is well understood in that sense of the community.

The stone wall is in the old section of Jerusalem. It is a part of the wall built in the time of Nehemiah.

But the body of Christ is a unique type of community. We are bound together because of Christ and are in community with others because we are in commune with Christ. As such, we are connected in ways we otherwise might not be. Therefore, we should have a focus that runs truer and deeper than simply being part of a neighborhood or residents of a certain city/town. We see an example of this in Nehemiah where chapter 3 reveals name after name of individuals who came together not just because of their proximity to one another, but because the people of God had a need to protect themselves from the enemy.

If you look closely at the text in Nehemiah 3, a common word (or concept) occurs repeatedly. The word is “next” or “after.” In building the wall, having gaps would defeat the purpose. The people worked side by side, not just because they were neighbors, but as people of God. Many may have been doing the same or similar jobs, but they were serving side by side to accomplish the task at hand. While working, they were ridiculed to the point of having to repair with one hand while holding a sword in the other. But, because of focus they built the wall in 52 days (Nehemiah 6.15). And notice the reaction of the enemies. Read Nehemiah 6.16.

What can we learn from this? When God’s people work together under His leadership, great work is done. It was true during the time of Nehemiah by the people of God, and it can be true in our time as the Body of Christ. The key is to see one another as more than merely citizens of NW Missouri, or Atchison County, or even Fairfax. That connection is important, but it is external. For followers of Christ, we have an internal connection, and that community must be paramount.

God’s People are Connected for Fulfillment (Plan)

A key element in this story is mentioned in Nehemiah 7.4. The city was wide and large, but few lived there because the houses had not been rebuilt. For 52 days, the people of Israel were connected by a focus that was beyond themselves. Despite many (most, nearly all?) of them not having a place to live, their focus was on helping one another. Of course, we are able to view this story from its completion and, thus, we see what unfolded afterward. But for them, they could only do so in faith. But Nehemiah had a plan because God had a plan, and if the people remained connected, the plan would be fulfilled and thus, they would be fulfilled!

Notice what Nehemiah did next. He essentially took a census. Again, God directed this (Nehemiah 7.5), but the list of names in Nehemiah 7 is a genealogical record of the people who had returned from captivity over the past century. To us, this may seem like just another list of pointless names in the Bible, but to the Israelites/now Jews, this information was critical. These names represented who owned what land and where. And for us, these names are a part of the record of what was to come in the genealogy of Jesus in Matthew 1 and Luke 3. The personal fulfillment begins near the end of Nehemiah 7 as the text tells us the people now had a place to live (v. 73).

The connection of these individuals is not just to one another in what was their present tense, it was a reminder of the faithfulness of God from the time of their ancestors. God had fulfilled His promise to bring His people into the Promised Land. God had fulfilled His promise to remove His people if they were not faithful to Him. And God had subsequently promised to return them to the Promised Land after 70 years passed. Thus, the fulfillment here is not just the people feeling fulfilled, but the Lord fulfilling His promise to His people.

How did the people respond? They gathered to hear the Word of the Lord proclaimed – from early morning until midday (8.3). And the people stood when they heard it (8.5), they celebrated what the Lord had done (8.9-18), and they repented of their sins (Nehemiah 9).

What can we learn from this? When God’s people respond to the purposes of God, they will be fulfilled. That fulfillment is ultimately a fulfilling of what God has promised, but the community of God (now, the body of Christ) will find our fulfillment in Him. Again, the people sacrificed their personal desires for the good of the community, and later celebrated as a community in response to what God had done. And finally, that fulfillment was complete when they confessed all that they, and their ancestors had done to turn their hearts from God. (Notice the prayer goes all the way back to the golden calf – 9.16). Likewise, we need to allow ourselves to be fulfilled by God, to celebrate what He has done in our midst, and confess our sins (collectively) to God.

So, God’s people are connected in their focus, for fulfillment, but also for the future.

God’s People are Connected for a Future (People)

In Chapter 10, we once again have a list of names. More names are listed in Chapter 11, and even more in Chapter 12. Again, why all the names? Because we have moved from the past to what is now being built for the future. Chapter 10 contains the names of those who have made and now confirm (seal) a covenant with God. (Read Nehemiah 9.38; 10.28-29). Chapter 11 contains the names of the leaders in Jerusalem – those largely responsible for ensuring the covenant will be kept. Then Chapter 12 mentions the heritage from which the current leaders must honor – that is, those who returned to Israel after the exile, as much as a century earlier. Like the faithfulness shown by Jeshua, Zerubabbel, and others since the return to Israel, the new generation must be faithful to pass on a true faith in God so that the generations going forward did not make the same mistakes that their forefathers had made.

In other words, the covenant was one to protect the community from cursed by God again for breaking His laws (see 10.29). The future of Israel had been disrupted in the past by their lack of faithfulness, and now these leaders were committing themselves to do their part to make sure Israel’s future was secure going forward.

What can we learn from this? The success of a person is not as great as the success of a people. Some people will consider themselves successful based upon certain characteristics of their life. But as the people of God knew in Nehemiah’s day, God is interested in His people as much as He is the person. Do not misunderstand me, Jesus died for individual people. But the gospel is not meant for one person, it is meant for the future of a people. As Paul wrote in Romans 1.16, “The gospel is the power for salvation – first for the Jew and then the Gentile.” By Jew and Gentile, Paul meant as a race, not as individuals.

CONCLUSION

I began this post by talking about broken bones. As individuals, one of the greatest ways we can be broken is to not be connected – that is, to be alone. As God said before creating the woman, “It is not good that the man should be alone” (Genesis 2.18). We are created for community. We are created to be connected. But connection with one another is not sufficient. We must be connected with God.

And that is why Jesus came. We are the bone that is broken beyond repair. So, God took a part of His bone and did a type of bone graft – allowing Jesus – as the “healthy bone” – to be grafted into our life to heal us. We cannot be healed on our own…we must have the healing of Jesus. Until you have that healing, nothing I said here today will make sense. If you already have the healing Jesus offers, then you likely already realize where He needs you to be healed further. Why? Because if we are truly connected, then when others hurt, we hurt too. And perhaps some of that healing we have experienced can be passed on to others. That is what it means to be connected. That is what it means to consider others as yourself (Philippians 2.3) and to love others as yourself (Leviticus 19.18).

What happens when we don’t? Well, as of right now, that will be the focus of next week’s message.

And that is why our…

 JOURNEY letter for today is:  UUNITE.

The common theme today has been to be connected. Whether that connection is in our focus, our fulfillment, or for the future, we must be united with one another. And that unity is possible only because of Jesus. We are first united to Him, and then with one another. But if we are united to Him, we must be united with one another. Otherwise, as John wrote, how can we know if we truly love God (1 John 4.19-20)?

A part of today’s message related to being fulfilled. To do so must include confessing sin. If you have any unconfessed sin, but particularly in light of this week’s message, if you need to forgive someone or seek forgiveness from someone, I encourage you to seek God now to ask for His forgiveness, and/or courage to take the next step. Then take whatever that next step is.

PRINCIPLE:  Like the bones of a body, God’s people are to be connected.

QUESTION:  What, if anything, is keeping you from being connected with others in this local body of Christ?

OPPORTUNITY:  Connect more deeply with God and with others – in purpose, for fulfillment, and for the future of all involved.

NEXT STEP(S):

LEARN:   If you know what keeps you from connecting with God or with others, write it down. If you do not know what the issue is, take time to reflect and pray to determine what it might be.

LIVE:  What you discover in LEARN, make prominent for you. Place the note where you will see it regularly and be encouraged to respond to it positively.

LOVE:  As you process the LIVE step, you will naturally begin to love God and others more. New challenges may arise, but that is part of the maturing process – so keep focused.

LEAD:  As you begin to experience a deeper connection with God and others, share your experiences as an encouragement to others.

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